Peter Purvis: How the redpipes changed my work with the band

Canadian grade 1 piper Peter Purvis who is mainly known for his work with the Celtic rock band Gaelic Storm gave us an interview after having purchased his second redpipe.

Peter is one of our very early customers. Five years ago Purvis bought a redpipe Caledonia which is the electronic version of a Great Highland Bagpipe. He was the first international artist to play the Caledonia on stage. Being asked for the advantages that this instrument brought him for his professional work Peter states that mainly the reliability of the redpipe under every condition made a big difference. Every piper knows that it may be quite a problem if playing his bagpipes at different locations with i.e. various conditions. Playing at lovcations with high altitudes may have a grave impact on the tuning.

For a musiscian that is performing at sea-level as well as in mountain regions this turned out to be precious.
„Since I play redpipes on stage I never had any technical problems“, Peter says, „and the sound is always well balanced over the whole scale of tones.“

Another advantage for him playing together with other musicians in a band context is that with his redpipe Peter is able to play in the ideal key that fits perfectly to the voice of the singer or the key preferences of other musicians.

With Gaelic Storm his band that is widely known in Canada and the US Purvis uses different sounds that the redpipe provides. Every redpipe comes with four different babpipe sounds that are carefully sampled tone-by-tone from the acoustic models. Lately he bought the new redpipe that has the design of a Scottish Smallpipe. The reason for him was that he wanted a proper representation for the tunes that he plays with the Smallpipe sound.

You may watch the whole interview with Peter Purvis on vimeo:

and live with Gaelic Storm:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AELRJ4ul4mQ

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